Tag collecting

Chinese and Japanese collection

I love being an antique collector with modern technology. What becomes possible for the amateur collector was only possible for large budget auction houses of the past. Here I’ll make a little “catalog” of the collection that I’ve put together for a theme auction. Many of the pieces I’ve very recently acquired as I’ve been learning a lot about the market in my free time. Keep in mind that I auction things at rated prices and not starting with no reserve. Thanks for reading and viewing! ๐Ÿ™‚

Chinese Antiques:

Great pieces. One of the few that I’ve discussed with a true expert in the field. The pair were made off of the same model. Take a look at it. I’ve had these in my collection for a while and I suspect I’ll hold onto them for a while longer. That’s okay, the work into them is beautiful and they’re enamel on copper with extra detail and effort put into coloring the flowers. Not the typical cloisonne.

Blue and white double happiness ginger jar. Unmarked but with strong signs of age. Would be a great decorative addition to any space. I hear blue and white is coming back from a few different fronts.

Our first piece of thai export market porcelain. We’ve been learning a lot more about this type of export china because of our locality. I believe there is quite a bit here but I’ve yet to find a truly extravagant example like some of the museum pieces I’ve seen. Here is a humble, yet smart porcelain tazza.

Early 20th Century Chinese Vintage to Antique:

This is a nice copper matchstick holder made for the tourist market in the early to mid 20th century. It isn’t too big but it really packs a punch in its style, which is almost a repousse manner.

Nice vintage to antique famille rose Chinese bowl. Flower and panel scenes typical of the style.

One of my favorite pieces here, this is a small porcelain jardiniere made in blue and white. Found this little guy hiding in a garage. Will be happy to have it go to a good home where it will be appreciated! ๐Ÿ™‚

Vintage urn, my suspicions upon acquiring was that it was around 1960-70. The finial has actual wear and there is serious oxidation under the lid. It could be a bit earlier but I would be surprised of that.

With a 6 character mark, I’m fairly positive that this is an early 20th century porcelain ware. Maybe still an antique by 2017 as a starting point.

A fun, colorful plate from the 30s or 40s.

An early to mid 20th century famille rose style large vase with great scenes. It has some enamel damage but is in decent condition for its age.

Retro China – mid to late 20th Century Vintage:

Strangely enough, one of the heavy hitters of the collection. Found recently, these cinnabar cloisonne combo vases are a rare pickup from the mid to late 20th century. Features cherry blossoms and a lotus flower on the back.

Another interesting find, this vase features more people than any I’ve ever seen. I wouldn’t be surprised if this piece of pottery had over 100 people on it. I assume that it’s a festival make from the mid to late 20th century. It was acquired from the estate of a couple who worked a long time for an airline co.

Another acquisition from the same estate as above. This ceramic pillow was a great addition to our collection. We date it to the same time as previous piece, it may have even been bought at the same location.

An interesting piece of our collection, this was acquired years ago. It’s a ruffled white and blue glass piece made by a studio in china, ca 1960. It has a ground pontil mark, which is quite unusual for this type of ware. This is an antique of tomorrow.

Beautiful modern cloisonne that will sit somewhere stylishly. White, blue and teal for those that are into that.

A good example for the difference between modern, contemporary cloisonne and the antique wares. Look at the brilliant colors that you only see on modern pieces.

A bit earlier. This pickup is classic “retro china.”

Kitsch 1980s export china porcelain tea cup, very fine and light

Resin or resinwood decorative molded vase. I was skeptical at first as it isn’t the quality of the antique pieces but it does fit in rather well with the other pieces.

Modern chinese brush box. It’s a great piece with a wonderful look.

Japanse Antiques:

Sometsuke Edo period Japanese Cup. Have seen it labelled as a tea cup, soba cup, water cup and more. Lovely period styles underneath the light glaze. Condition is less than perfect with a slight crack but truly a great piece with age. Bought from a good estate.

Purchased from the same estate as the Edo period cup, this charger is from a bit later in the 19th century. It is a wonderfully decorated piece and it is much more intricate than others I have seen from the period. Imari Sometsuke again. Is blue and white getting stronger? We’ll see!

More unusual pieces. This polychrome imari bowl is late 19th or early 20th century. It has strange dragons. They look like they want to fight.

Marked Nippon, this piece dates to the turn of the 20th century. It is imitating the European style for export china during the period. The piece itself is marked hand-painted.

Retro Japan:

Brush pots are in. I’m not 100% sure why, but I know that they are. The market for them looks really strong right now. We’ll see how this one does. I added it to my collection recently.

Another recent addition to the collection, this unusual piece is vintage japan.

Another vintage piece, this Imari ware porcelain jardiniere features a wagon.

Cute modern dotted Japanese cups or bowls.

Hope you enjoy!

Moving on along!

As my title line says, 2017 is a weird time to be a private collector. With most of my collection for sale, there are times when things get off to a roll. Yesterday was a great day. It started with a couple small bids on some collectible electronics and a lowball bid on a piece of sculpture. Good start, right?

I went out to go shopping knowing that there was some good money on the backend. It was still the weekend and I live in the city, I think I go to a lot more garage sales than most other collectors. ย They’re great once you accept the majority are junk. There was also a historic home that was opened up and I figured I’d pop in to see what was there. Well, it was a good sale. They had the nice stuff, stuff that I wish I had thousands of dollars to buy. So it goesss. One day.

I spent more than I needed to but I got some beautiful stuff to line up for my asian items auction. Here’s a preview of the stuff that’s going in that auction. We’ll see how it goes! Nothing extraordinary on this run. It’s all good stuff, though. Here’s a quick preview:

Well, the day got even better when my wife and mother-in-law came back with fresh cookies and peppers to cook for dinner! That was a great surprise. I had done quite a bit of work with getting new inventory online and we were both getting hungry at that point. Made a vegetarian influenced version of sloppy joes and it turned out quite well. Yum.

After dinner, I went back to some work and got some good gaming time in that I had been hoping for all week. Then eBay lit up. Woop. That low ball offer was replaced by a more serious collector who gave a realistic offer. I accepted because I enjoy moving things out of the collection, even if I am somewhat attached to the item like in this case.

This statue made by Robert Voigt in 1968 will leave a big hole in the house where it was. I’m glad to send it off to a new home. It sure was great to own it for a while. I still have a piece of pottery by Voigt from a near year and some artwork that I believe he did that is unsigned.

Anyway, things are going well. Website isn’t where I want it to be but that’s alright! I have less time because I’m busier than expected and that’s good! Here’s a photo of my top shelf before the Voigt statue heads out. Cheers, y’all!

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Trades in Travel – P2 Suburban Illinois

Day two of buying featured a different array of stores. And beyond just telling the tales, I will do item profiles for specific pieces that were bought. I don’t know. Sometimes I wonder what I’m doing with this blog and I think that the antique market is just so poorly catalogued online that maybe that’s where I’ll end up contributing some serious work. I have no shame in telling people what things sell for, not what I think they’ll sell for but what they’ve actually sold for(either by me or through publicly available information) – I’m not big enough to make anyone pay for my info yet! Haha.

Anyway, day 2 featured some garage sales and a great antique gallery that I’ll profile some other time, too! At the first sale we went to, we had to wait in line, which was a bummer. I like to arrive late so that I don’t have to wait but c’est la vie.

The two of us finally were allowed in and we were shocked at the beauty of the house. It was tacky, probably put up in 1968 but it had that real strong vintage rambler feel to it. It couldn’t have been a rambler, though, it was huge. There was a dance-floor in the basement and beautiful Japanese furniture was spread through the house. It was a museum of mid 20th century American taste where everything was for sale.

I managed to grab two prized asian cloisonne and I held them tight to my chest for the rest of the sale. An elderly man was outlining the figures on them with his hands, he muttered, “so unique,” and “very interesting,” a few times. I did see him again leaving the sale with 8-10 other pieces of cloisonne. I took it as a good sign that he had to look at mine before he probably never saw them again. They are beautiful and will get their own profile.

So I’m picking up lovely asian artifacts and admiring a beautiful early 20th century Japanese desk, what could make it a better morning? My shopping partner has managed to find a 60s repro of a Tiffany lamp made in Korea. Retail price for original Tiffany? About $12,000. Retail Price for her vintage repro? About $460. Cost that day? $35. I don’t normally give repros a stamp of approval but I’ll be keeping my eyes out for Tiffany fakes now.

So it’s been a pretty good run so far, I’ve got a new brown 1950s NYC Fedora that I picked up on the cheap, the sun is shining and overall life is good. The day went on in a sort of similar fashion. Got some great stuff at the next sale. Witnessed a true artifact, touched it and pushed the boundaries for enigmatic travels of antique objects. Staring right at me was an antique remake of a Ming dynasty throne chair. It was beautiful. Its long shaped wood subtly announced with its precise craftsmanship that the person in this chair was not like the others.

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The Qing dynasty remake of the Ming dynasty chair was marked at $1400. This is the point where I would normally start to sweat. Doing all sorts of ridiculous, illogical maths in my head to reach the sad conclusion… no, it’s not worth the $600 I don’t have to hustle this chair. I thanked it for coming into my life, allowing me to see it, touch it, consider it and walk away from it. I don’t know if I’ll ever touch one of these again. Truly remarkable. Again, when and if we meet again, I hope I am able buy you.

I’ll leave it there for now and pick up at inventorying the trip so far and the wonderful antique mall we visited.